Blog

Oops. I just deleted all of the files in my archive/images directory because I had downloaded and optimized MOST of them. Any of the images that were posted to the weblog are going to be broken until I can get to my backup tomorrow.

The Girls Room tour was g.d. awesome! The night started off excellently with the local act. A powerful voice, skillful piano work, and undeniably emotional lyrics marked the performance by Keri Noble. No one was expecting anything from the local act, especially since we had seen her walking around nervously before the performance. She played Perfect, and two other songs of which I have forgotten the titles. Tara MacLean was the reason why she played three songs. After two, Keri began to walk off stage while the crowd was in an uproar. Tara ran over and practically shoved her back on stage. My group gave her a standing O when she was done. Following this display of musical excellence was a mockery: Amy Correia. Described as having a ‘unique voice’ and ‘eclectic songs’, that is just one way of saying that she sucks. Expect www.AmyCorreiaSucks.com before too long. Starfishin’ was one of the most annoying songs I have ever heard. Angels Collide had good lyrics, but that is the only good thing I will ever have to say about that girl. Knowing that Tara was coming on next, my group sat on the floor directly in front of the stage. Two of the people I was with had seen Tara 4 times before, and I have heard great things about her shows. She was just as vivacious, cute, and talented as they had all said. We all got to sing along with If You Could because the crowd did it for her last time she was in the Detroit area and she loved it. After Tara was Shannon McNally: more crap. Fast Forward to the signing session. I was too shy to talk to either Keri or Tara.

The script bows quite low;

Honor the lack of a quote,

The script is renewed!

The script is broken.

Installation of NT?

Not so fast, buddy.

Collins, head of the Human Genome Project, has decided that he will not support germline therapy, the process by which DNA is modified for all future generations.